Promising Returns: How Embracing Immigrants with Temporary Protected Status can Contribute to Family Stability, Economic Growth, and Fiscal Health

Author: 
Dalia Gonzales, Thai Le, Manuel Pastor & Nicole Svajlenka
Date of Publication: 
April, 2019
Source Organization: 
University of Southern California

With the continuous announcements to terminate Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and Deferred Enforced Departure (DED), immigrant families are at risk of deportation. Many of these individuals with TPS or DED have been in the United States for quite some time, as some of the requirements for these statuses necessitate individuals to have been present in the United States as early as the 1990’s. As a result, many individuals with TPS have long records of working hard, purchasing homes, and even establishing businesses. And they are not alone: they are also forming and raising families, and so nearly a million individuals currently live in households in which at least one family member has TPS.

While it has been a stressful and chaotic time for TPS and DED recipients, recently introduced legislation like the American Dream and Promise Act of 2019 may potentially provide relief. To highlight the potential implications of this bill, the authors of Promising Returns: How Embracing Immigrants with Temporary Protected Status can Contribute to Family Stability, Economic Growth, and Fiscal Health use recent estimates of all eligible TPS recipients under this bill to provide data on households, contributions to state GDP, mortgage and rent payments that help sustain local housing markets, tax contributions, and labor market composition.

Some of the findings show that if passed, this bill would impact nearly 1.3 million people who have or are eligible for TPS themselves or live in a household with a family member who is eligible under the Promise Act. The authors also estimate that Promise Act households contribute more than $35.2 billion to the country’s GDP and more than $4.6 billion to federal, state, and local taxes. Promise households also help prop up the U.S. housing market: The authors estimate that the total sum of annual mortgage payments from Promise Act households is more than $1.5 billion on an annual basis while the total annual sum of rent payments from Promise Act households exceed $2.8 billion. In regards to the labor sector and individuals eligible under the Promise Act, the industries with the highest presence of Promise Act workers are construction, accommodation and food services, administrative and support and waste management service, manufacturing, retail trade, and health care and social assistance. As shown through these results, the Promise Act could help the United States significantly retain rather than lose these economic contributions.

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Citation: 

Gonzales, D., Le, T., Pastor, M., & Svajlenka, N. (2019). Promising Returns: How Embracing Immigrants with Temporary Protected Status can Contribute to Family Stability, Economic Growth, and Fiscal Health. University of Southern California, Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration. Retrieved from https://dornsife.usc.edu/assets/sites/731/docs/Promising_Returns_April_2019_TPS_Brief.pdf

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